cheap flights from new jersey to florida ‘Silent disability’ is changing people’s lives and few know about it

cheap custom nhl jerseys ‘Silent disability’ is changing people’s lives and few know about it

Aphasia has touched every part of Rose Shuff’s life her profession, her purpose, her passion for karate and how she interacts with the world around her.

But it hasn’t stopped her.

She still teaches karate and communicates with friends, civic groups and others at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Shuff’s life looked and sounded very differently 20 years ago. on a Sunday.

Buy PhotoStroke survivor Rose Shuff leads a karate class at the Comeaux Recreation Center in Lafayette Wednesday, June 14, 2017. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)

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She lived aloneanddidn’t have to be at work until Tuesday. She expectsno one would have found her until she didn’t show up to work two days later if her friend hadn’t been visiting her that weekend.

Shuff was taken to a New Iberia hospital where they administered tPA, a clot busting drug that can stop stroke effects such as brain damage, within an hour and a half.

The Food and Drug Administration had approved the revolutionarydrug a month earlier, Shuff said.

“If I had not had that I would have been in the nursing home,” she said. “It saved my life.”

She spent 52 days in hospitals in New Iberia and Lafayette, including rehabilitation time. Then she did out patient physical, occupational and speech therapy for about two years. She describes rehabilitation as a “never ending journey” in her presentations.

Along with the physical loss of ability on her right side, her stroke impaired her ability to communicate.

“The doctor said I would probably never be able to live on my own . because of my ongoing care,” she said.

But she proved that wrong.

Buy PhotoStroke survivor Rose Shuff leads a karate class at the Comeaux Recreation Center in Lafayette Wednesday, June 14, 2017. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)

Today she is living on her own and helping others with the “silent disability.”

She volunteers at the center and works to educatepeople about the condition, especially during June Aphasia Awareness Month.

“We’re trying to bridge the gap between the medical community and the general public,” she said. “We’re tryingto make them aware of the effects of the silent disability.”

She wants to reach businesses like grocery storesand other places “peoplewith aphasia tend to frequent.”

“Aphasia hurts your ability to interact with the communityaround you and you have a hard time understanding,” Tetnowski said. “That extends to numbers and money. Going to the grocery store can be terrifying.”

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The condition is isolating and life changing.

“You lose yourself,” Tetnowski said. “Most people tie our identity with what we do. If we don’t know what to do we don’t know who we are. It’s hard to create a new identity when you can’t communicate.”

Shuff’s stroke impactedher ability to practice and teach karate, something she has been doing for more than 30 years.
cheap flights from new jersey to florida 'Silent disability' is changing people's lives and few know about it